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Click on the imageย for 500 Words Story Writing Tips

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In connection with my previous post about the 500 Words Writing Competition, the BBC Radio 2 website has a few really interesting videos and tips on how to be a good, and imaginative, writer.

Phoenix is at school right now, but I’ll be sure to share this with him when he comes home.

Excited to see what he can produce.

Perhaps I’ll post it when he’s done ๐Ÿ™‚


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500 Words Silver Winner (Age 8)

Today, I read about Radio 2’s 500 Words Competition. In this competition, children are encouraged to write a story of no more than 500 words.

Some of the entries were fantastic. I especially liked the very creative way this one story (see link) described the problem of having a stammer.

Great work!

There’s a link here for anyone else who’s interested in what our little ones can do when given the chance.

Enjoy!


http://www.kidspot.com.au/schoolzone/Friendships-Teaching-your-child-resilience+3994+394+article.htm

A couple of days ago, my little boy, Phoenix, came home from school with a piece of homework, which was to write a paragraph about what he had learned from his participation in a school project.

There were a couple of examples of what he should write – resilience was Groupofkidsonlawn476x290one of them.

Fantastic, I thought! This absolutely ties in with my research recently on what makes children successful.

So, I asked him : “Phoenix, what does resilience mean?”

“I don’t know,” came the answer.

Oh!

So, rather than tell him the dictionary definition, which would probably go in one ear and out the other, I thought it best that I lead by example.

I found a lovely few words on ‘teaching your child resilience‘, which I thought might be interesting reading for all us parents and teachers out there.

Here’s a summary :

1. Listen with your heart;

2. See the world through your child’s eyes;

3. Accept [your]children for who they are;

4. Develop strengths;

5. Teach that mistakes are an opportunity to learn;

6. Promote responsibility by giving responsibility;

7. Teach your children to make their own decisions;

8. Discipline, but don’t denigrate.

This is just a rough guide but I think there’s some good stuff here ….. well worth checking out!